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Afstand

113,2 km

Positief hoogteverschil

933 m

Moeilijkheidsgraad

Gemakkelijk

Negatief hoogteverschil

933 m

Max hoogteverschil

155 m

Trailrank

38 5

Min hoogteverschil

-3 m

Route type

Lus
  • Foto van Knollys' Tunnel & Devil's Woodyard Mud Volcano.
  • Foto van Knollys' Tunnel & Devil's Woodyard Mud Volcano.
  • Foto van Knollys' Tunnel & Devil's Woodyard Mud Volcano.
  • Foto van Knollys' Tunnel & Devil's Woodyard Mud Volcano.
  • Foto van Knollys' Tunnel & Devil's Woodyard Mud Volcano.
  • Foto van Knollys' Tunnel & Devil's Woodyard Mud Volcano.

Tijd

5 uren 30 minuten

Coördinaten

3353

Geüpload

13 augustus 2013

Uitgevoerd

augustus 2013
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155 m
-3 m
113,2 km

6870 maal bekeken, 7 maal gedownload

in de buurt Iere, Princes Town (Republic of Trinidad and Tobago)

Knollys' Tunnel is located in the village of Tabaquite in Central Trinidad. Construction of the tunnel was started in 1896 by Acting Governor of Trinidad and Tobago Sir Clement Courtney Knollys KCMG (1849-1905) using over 200 African and Indian labourers. The tunnel was officially opened by Sir Clement Courtney Knollys on August 13th, 1898. Knollys' tunnel is approximately 600 feet long, which makes it one of the longest tunnels in the Caribbean region.
The village of Tabaquite was once known as the hub of Central Trinidad. This is because of the cocoa industry in the days when “Cocoa was King” and this area produced a lot of it. The tunnel was constructed primarily as a link between the Rio Claro hinterland and Port of Spain by the then Trinidad Government Railroad (T.G.R.). The tunnel also facilitated transportation by rail of cocoa, coffee, and other agricultural commodities from the rich Brasso-Caparo Valley area to the main trading areas in Port of Spain.
With the decline of the cocoa industry the government decided to close the railway and on August 20th, 1965 the last train rolled into Tabaquite. From then on the tunnel fell into a state of neglect and disrepair. Citing the historical significance as well as the potential for tourism the tunnel was refurbished and restored. It was re-opened in August 1991 as a tourist attraction in Tabaquite. There was also a bid to get the tunnel designated as a U.N.E.S.C.O. World Heritage Site. The future plans for the area now called “Knollys' Tunnel Rural Tourism Corridor and Biodiversity Nature Reserve” includes a Rural Information Technology Centre, a Herbal Garden with culinary and medicinal herbs, Nature Trails, reforestation with rare fruit trees and exotic plants, nursery and potting sheds, and an animal reserve.
Several routes exist to get to Tabaquite. Today I chose to drive through the Gran-Couva area into Tabaquite. This is a very scenic route through cocoa estates. To get here from Port of Spain use the Sir Solomon Hochoy Highway travelling south and take the Preysal exit at 10.41659°N and -61.41503°W. From San Fernando you would take the Sir Solomon Hochoy Highway travelling north and take the Couva exit located at 10.41295°N and -61.41705°W. There would be two roundabouts to navigate coming from San Fernando to get to the Preysal exit. From here you drive east along the Gran-Couva Main Road starting at 10.41659°N and -61.41503°W through Preysal. This road is in good condition but progressively deteriorates as you go along until it bottles down to one lane through Gran-Couva. You would go past the La Vega Gardens & Estate located at 10.41902°N and -61.34424°W. Turn onto Union Road at 10.42078°N and -61.32436°W and continue heading south-east. Union Road intersects the Rio Claro – Tabaquite Road at 10.38074°N and -61.32327°W. Union Road also intersects the Guaracara-Tabaquite Road. You can take either road to get to Tabaquite. However, continuing along Union Road is more direct. Stay along the Rio Claro – Tabaquite Road until John William Trace at 10.39115°N and -61.30298°W. The take the first road on the left at 10.39166°N and -61.30353°W. This road leads directly to and through the tunnel. Knollys' Tunnel is located at 10.39868°N and -61.30487°W. You can walk through this tunnel or drive right through. If you choose to drive through remember to use your high beam headlight and be aware of vehicles entering on the other side.
For the return you can re-trace your steps or continue the scenic route that eventually leads to Rio Claro. Continue along the Tabaquite Road heading south-east. The Tabaquite Road intersects the Torrib-Tabaquite Road at 10.34642°N and -61.27106°W. The Torrib-Tabaquite Road can be used to get to New Grant more directly. However, you would continue along the Tabaquite Road to get to Rio Claro. The Tabaquite Road goes past Harry's Water Park at 10.34175°N and -61.26062°W. This is an exceptional park for a day of family activities. This section of the road has a lot of depressions and landslides. It also narrows a bit in several areas. The Tabaquite Road then enters Rio Claro.
Take the roundabout and follow the Naparima-Mayaro Road back. This road goes through Libertville, Poole, Fonrose Village, Mairad Village, Tableland, Robert Village, George Village, New Grant, Petit Café, Indian Walk, St. Julien, and Craignish back into Princes' Town.
Devil's Woodyard National Park is located in the village of Hindustan, just east of Princes' Town. Take the Hindustan Road just off the Naparima-Mayaro Road at 10.27526°N and -61.33158°W. This road is in a very bad state of neglect and dis-repair and down to one lane in many places. The Devil's Woodyard National Park is located at 10.26328°N and -61.30443°W. The park has picnic and washroom facilities but seemed to be over-run with stray dogs when I visited.
The series of vents that make up this mud volcano first appeared in 1852. The local legend states that the site got its name after the first eruption in 1852. This eruption shook the entire village of Hindustan, caused many trees to fall, and frightened the Amerindian villagers. The Amerindian villagers believed that the devil had come from beneath the earth and fell the woods. Local Hindus believe that if they do not make offerings to the volcano the hindu goddess Durga (दुर्गा) will cause the volcano to erupt.
A mud volcano is a mound of watery mud or clay, forced out of the earth by methane gas. These volcanoes can either spew material with violent force, causing damage or simply release a mild surface upwelling of muddy water accompanied by gas bubbles; this is the more common occurrence. These volcanoes are sometimes known locally as "bouffe" (French for swelling), "morne" or "yard." The original Amerindian inhabitants of Trinidad called these areas 'guaico', meaning, "mud-stream". When the mud is of the dry type, a conical or volcano shape is usually formed. Wet mud tends to result in depressions.

1 reactie

  • Foto van Trini Hiker

    Trini Hiker 28 aug. 2013

    Ik heb deze route gevolgd  Bekijk in detail

    With the GPS log it was easy to follow and drive this trail... I enjoyed the tunnel and the mud volcano quite a lot... Very nice part of the country!!!